Section 613 of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires that consumer reporting agencies (CRAs), when reporting a consumer report for employment purposes which contains public record information, which are likely have an adverse effect upon a consumer’s ability to obtain employment, must either follow strict procedures or send notice to the consumer.  Both the

I recognize this is a few days late, but the content is still timely.  Last month I attended the NAPBS Mid-Year Conference in Washington, DC both as an attendee and speaker. One session of particular interest to me was Maneesha Mittal’s presentation.  Maneesha is the Associate Director of the Division of Privacy and Identity Protection

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has issued an updated guide for employers regarding compliance with the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) when conducting background checks, as well as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) guidance on the use of criminal history records for employment screening under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of

What do these have in common?  The fact that a federal district court judge believes that a plain reading of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires background screeners obtain from an employer a certification that the person “has complied” with section 604(b)(1) each and every time before providing a background report.  Meaning no use

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) will host a public workshop entitled “Big Data: A Tool for Inclusion or Exclusion?” in Washington, D.C. on September 15, 2014, to further explore the use of “big data” and its impact on American consumers, including low income and underserved consumers.    This is one in a series of workshops the