Check out the current Compliance News Flash with blurbs about:

  • The continuing partial government shutdown;
  • E-Verify (still shutdown);
  • The Federal Trade Commission (also shutdown);
  • Government background investigations and the NBIB (not shutdown);
  • The California Consumer Protection Act; and
  • A recent merger in the background screening industry.

In honor of MLK Day tomorrow:

“Darkness cannot drive

This week’s Compliance News Flash features information on New York City’s pay equity law, stats on FCRA litigation, personnel moves at the Federal Trade Commission, news about a Form I-9 scam, and information about my presentation on developing a compliant background screening at my firm’s upcoming Employment Law Seminar in Atlanta.

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The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently announced reforms to its internal processes to streamline information requests and improve transparency in Commission investigations.  Quick tutorial — the FTC may issue Civil Investigative Demands (CIDs) pursuant to the FTC Act to investigate possible “unfair or deceptive acts or practices” against consumers.

Stemming from the work of the

The Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) recently issued guidance applicable to background screening companies (aka consumer reporting agencies) who engage in tenant screening.  The FTC highlights four key responsibilities of background screening companies covered by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”), specifically:

  • “Follow reasonable procedures to ensure accuracy.
  • Get certifications from your clients.
  • Provide your clients

Yesterday I attended an interesting webinar regarding Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) developments.  Susan Camp Stocks from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and Katherine Ripley White from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) participated, along with my colleagues Bob Belair and Kevin Coy. The speakers covered a fair amount of ground on different FCRA issues,

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) just issued guidance for companies providing employment screening services.   According to the FTC, they have “created new guidance for businesses aimed at giving employment background screening companies information on how to comply with the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).” The FTC is referring to it as an “FCRA brochure” …

Section 613 of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires that consumer reporting agencies (CRAs), when reporting a consumer report for employment purposes which contains public record information, which are likely have an adverse effect upon a consumer’s ability to obtain employment, must either follow strict procedures or send notice to the consumer.  Both the